The latest news on teens and risky behavior—and what does it mean if you “overshare” on Facebook? Show Notes

Monday, June 23, 2014 Host(s): Dr. Bill Maier
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Do you “overshare” on Facebook?  It could be because you’re lonely.

According to PluggedIn.com, a new study done in Australia found that Facebook oversharing can indicate personal loneliness.

The researchers surveyed 600 female Facebook users, and found that those who identified themselves as "unconnected" and "lonely" tended to make a whole lot of information about themselves public—including favorite activities, quotations, movies, books, TV shows--even their street address.

They would also thoroughly fill out the "about me" section, with 98% of people in the "lonely" group sharing their relationship status publicly. "

Dr. Yeslam Al-Saggaf, one of the study's primary researchers, says “It makes sense that the people who felt lonely would disclose this type of information. They want to make it easier for others to initiate contact with them, which may help them overcome their feelings of loneliness."

In other family and culture-related news, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released its latest report about teens and risky behavior.

The good news is that fewer teenagers reported drinking alcohol.  And a smaller number of teens are smoking cigarettes.  Teen fights at school have fallen by half in the past 20 years—probably because schools are cracking down.

On the not-so-positive side is the percentage of teens who text while driving. A full 41% say they've texted or emailed behind the wheel during the past 30 days.

Another big jump was in the percentage of teens who spent three or more hours in front of a screen on school days.  And that’s “recreational screen time”--in other words watching videos, playing video games or using a computer or smartphone for something other than schoolwork.

For more information on the new report, visit cdc.gov and enter “youth risk” in the search engine.

I’m Bill Maier for WBCL.
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