Are your kids really studying when they hit the books? Show Notes

Wednesday, May 22, 2013 Host(s): Dr. Bill Maier
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Are American students really studying when they hit the books—or are they doing something else?

According to a story on Plugged In.com, researchers recently observed 263 students from middle school, high school and college as they were studying.  
 
Interestingly, they found that within two minutes, many were texting, tweeting, surfing the Web, watching TV or updating their Facebook page.  After 15 minutes, the scientists found that students had spent just 65% of their time, on average, actually studying.

Research indicates that multitaskers generally remember less of what they study. And the stuff they do remember, they have more difficulty understanding.
 
David Meyer, a psychology professor at the University of Michigan points out that there's nothing magical about the brains of tech-savvy young people that prevents them from being impacted by the effects of multitasking.  
 
He says "They may like to do it, they may even be addicted to it, but there's no getting around the fact that it's far better to focus on one task from start to finish."
 
And while we’re talking technology, check out this new research.  
 
According to a new study by the National Safety Council, motor vehicle crashes involving cellphones are "vastly underreported."  The council estimates that fully 25% of all motor vehicle crashes in the U.S. now involve cellphone use.
 
And if you’ve warned your teens about the dangers of texting and driving, are you practicing what you preach?

It turns out that 90 percent of parents surveyed reported technology-related multitasking in the past month, such as talking on the phone, texting or changing a DVD or CD. 
 
And here’s the worst part—these parents admit to doing these distracting things while driving WITH THEIR KIDS IN THE CAR!  Yikes!!!
 
I’m Bill Maier for WBCL.
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