A U.S. Senator talks tough about “separation of church and state”—and a New York City cab driver shares his faith through Christian music Show Notes

Monday, December 02, 2013 Host(s): Dr. Bill Maier
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A U.S. Senator talks tough about the so-called “separation of church and state”

Florida Senator Marco Rubio says America's morality is at risk. Rubio spoke at a fundraising dinner for the Florida Family Policy Council. 

He told the group the debate in Washington should not be whether issues about moral values should be debated, but rather which issues to debate. 

He also said the argument about whether God should be allowed in schools or in the government is ridiculous because God is everywhere and doesn't need permission to be in either.

In other faith news, a taxi driver in New York City is using his job as an opportunity to minister to the people of New York. 

Joseph Djan drives a cab, but he’s also an evangelical pastor. He plays Christian hip-hop music while driving and says the music is what usually gets the conversation started with his passengers.

Djan says “About 90 percent of the people love the message, once in a while you come across people that don’t want to hear anything. You just can pray for them.” 

Djan says driving a cab is just a side job.  When he’s not behind the wheel, he’s studying for a master’s degree in theology

And is Ted Turner re-considering his position on Christianity? Ted turned 75 last week and he says he no longer considers himself an atheist. He also says he prays for friends who are dying of cancer.

Turner says he's a skeptic by nature, but he now allows for the possibility that God exists. 

As a child, he wanted to be a missionary. But he lost faith after he watched his little sister, Mary Jean, die of complications from a rare form of lupus. He says Mary Jean’s death shook his faith in Christianity.

Let’s pray that Ted will come to know God in a very real way!

I’m Bill Maier for WBCL.
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