A Christian doctor makes a huge breakthrough—and—will Israel be spared from a plague of locusts? Show Notes

Wednesday, March 20, 2013 Host(s): Dr. Bill Maier
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A Christian doctor makes headlines for curing a baby girl with AIDS. 

The pediatrician whose treatment cured a baby girl born with HIV is a Christian who spent years living as a missionary with her husband in Ethiopia.

Dr. Hannah Gay is a physician at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.  She and other doctors are credited with treating and tracking the progress of the baby girl who was cured of HIV after receiving therapy within 30 hours of her birth. 

Back in the 1980s, Dr. Gay worked with her husband as a missionary in Addis Ababa Ethiopia.   

According to the assistant director for media relations at the Medical Center, Dr. Gay is, “a wonderful person" who was able to leverage her experience and knowledge to make life better for the baby.  He says “I am guessing that her faith informed the way she has lived her life.” 

Dr. Gay has four children and a grandson and those who know her say she is a devout Christian who puts her faith first.

In other faith-related news, officials in Israel are monitoring swarms of locusts riding the wind in from Egypt.  The locusts could arrive just before the Passover holiday there.  

The Israeli Agriculture Ministry says it's spraying pesticides in an effort to contain the locusts, which have entered southern Israel. 

Locusts can have a devastating effect on agriculture by quickly stripping crops. But some Israelis see the locusts as a kosher snack -- a kind of manna from heaven. 

According to the Bible, locusts were the eighth of 10 plagues God imposed on Egyptians to persuade Pharaoh to free the ancient Hebrews from slavery. 

So keep our friends in Israel in prayer, that God would spare their land from a locust invasion.   By the way, the Jewish Passover begins on March 25 this year.

I’m Bill Maier for WBCL.

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