Why you should keep a close eye on your child’s SALT intake in the New Year. Show Notes

Friday, December 28, 2012 Host(s): Dr. Bill Maier
Listen Now Number of listens: 0Download File Number of downloads: 0

Here’s an important story for parents as we get ready to enter the New Year. Are your kids getting too much SALT in their diet? The fact is that childhood obesity is a growing problem in the US, and excess salt intake may have a lot to do with it. 

CBS News writer Ryan Jaslow reports on a new study done in Australia—it found that reducing the amount of salt in kids’ diets may be a first step in preventing obesity. That’s because salty foods lead kids to reach for sugary drinks—a major contributor to childhood obesity.

The researchers tracked the eating and drinking habits of 4,200 Australian kids. They found that the kids who took in the most salt, also consumed the most sugary drinks.

For every one gram of salt per day, children took in 17 grams per day more of a sugary drink. Children who drank more than one serving per day of a sugary drink were more likely to be obese.

While we know that salty foods can cause us to be thirsty, experts were quick to point out the study did not show cause and effect for salt's role in obesity. 

By the way, The American Heart Association recommends that people should take in no more than 1,500 milligrams milligrams of sodium each day.

However, a recent survey found most Americans average 3,400 milligrams of sodium each day, mostly from processed and restaurant foods.

And what are the biggest sodium culprits? Breads and rolls, cold cuts and cured meats, pizza, poultry, soup and sandwiches.

To learn more about a healthy level of salt intake, go to the Heart Association’s website at heart.org.

I’m Bill Maier for WBCL.

« search entire media archive