Dr. Bill shares some startling new stats on how we use “tech” to communicate with each other Show Notes

Monday, December 17, 2012 Host(s): Dr. Bill Maier
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Some new stats on Americans’ use of technology are out, and some of them are startling.

Focus on the Family’s PluggedIn.com reports on several new studies, including new research on smart phone use from Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business.

It turns out that most college students in the US interact with their phones about seven hours every day. That includes sending an average of 110 texts, receiving 113 texts and checking their phones 60 times.

James Roberts, a Baylor professor and author of the book Materialism 2.0, says this about the findings, "At first glance, one might have the tendency to dismiss [this level of] mobile phone use as merely youthful nonsense—a passing fad. But an emerging body of literature has given increased credence to cell phone addiction and similar behavioral addictions."

Another new study looked at social networking. The Neilson company found that the average woman who uses social network sites spends 18 hours and 20 minutes on sites like Facebook each month.   That’s compared to about 13 hours for males.

Among 18- to 24-year-olds, both men and women spend an average of 21 hours a month social networking. 25- to 34-year-olds are close behind at 20 hours a month. 

Many experts are concerned that we are spending so much time communicating electronically vs. face-to-face, and I tend to agree. 

God calls us to deep, authentic relationships with others. First Peter 1:22 tells us to “love one another deeply, from the heart.” Is that really possible if our relationships are based on texts, tweets and Facebook posts?

I’m Bill Maier for WBCL.

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